The Dynamic Process of Legislative History: The New Norm of Ad Hoc Legislating ~ Article on “How Legislative Procedure Shapes Legislative History”

Drexel University Earle Mack School of Law Legal Research Center Research and Instructional Services Librarian John Cannan has authored an excellent article on the subject matter of the above headline in the latest issue (volume 105, number 2, Spring 2013, pages 131-173) of the American Association of Law Libraries’ (AALL’s) Law Library Journal:

A Legislative History of the Affordable Care Act: How Legislative Procedure Shapes Legislative History

The article’s abstract reads:

Using the health care legislation passed in 2010 as a model to show how legislative procedure shapes legislative history, this article posits that legislative procedure has changed, making the traditional model of the legislative process used by law librarians and other researchers insufficient to capture the history of modern legislation. To prove this point, it follows the process through which the health care legislation was created and describes the information resources generated. The article concludes by listing resources that will give law librarians and other researchers a grounding in modern legislative procedure and help them navigate the difficulties presented by modern lawmaking.

Cross-posted at Law Library Blog.

“Judges and Their Papers” by Kathryn A. Watts, Univ. of Washington School of Law — Who should own a federal judge’s papers?

University of Washington (UW) School of Law Associate Professor Kathryn A. Watt’s subject, thought-provoking paper is here.

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog.

Cross-posted at Law Library Blog.

A Helpful Resource (that’s been around a while): AALL’s Legislative Action Center

A helpful resource on current U.S. federal and state legislative activity — which has been around a while (since October 2011, actually, per this posting) — is the American Association of Law Libraries’ (AALL’s):

Legislative Action Center (LAC)

Content at the LAC frequently includes convenient “Advocacy One-Pagers” — see, for example:

  • here ["Urge your Representative to Support the Access to Congressionally Mandated Reports Act (H.R. 1380)], &
  • here [PDF of Advocacy One-Pager "Access to Congressionally Mandated Reports Act"]

The LAC is helpfully searchable too, per the following layout:

Search within Government Relations

[Advanced Search]

Cross-posted on Legal Research Plus.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

Legislative Research & Intent LLC (LRI) Launches “Online Store” Research

Legislative Research & Intent LLC (LRI) has launched an

“Online Store”

and California legislative history and legislative intent research is reportedly available to academic patrons (law school faculty and students) at no charge.

Content is described as follows:

  • 1943-2006
    Every regular session California bill that became law from 1943 through 2006 is covered in this part of our unique, groundbreaking database. No other service offers this comprehensive coverage. While the number of available files varies per bill, we provide one or more sources of legislative history for every bill that passed.
  • 2007-Current
    Selected, regular session California bills that became law from 2007 to current are covered in this part of our database. Because it consists of files from our precompiled legislative histories, multiple files are provided for each bill. If your bill is not found, consider our Custom or Core reports, or contact us.

Carolina Rose

Carolina C. Rose, J.D., President
Legislative Research & Intent LLC
1107 9th Street, Suite 220
Sacramento, CA 95814
(916) 442-7660 Phone
(800) 530-7613 Toll Free
(916) 442-1529 Fax
Carolina.Rose@lrihistory.com
www.lrihistory.com

has very kindly provided the following updated information about LRI’s offer here.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

New Congressional Research Service (CRS) Report: “The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA): Background and Policy Options for the 113th Congress”

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) earlier this month released and posted a valuable new Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)-related report:

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA): Background and Policy Options for the 113th Congress
By Wendy Ginsberg, Analyst in American National Government
March 8, 2013
R41933

Hat tip to Law Librarian Blog.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

Conferences on Legal Information: Scholarship and Teaching COACh template ~ a framework for legal research activity/lesson planning

The 3rd and 4th [summer] Boulder Conferences on Legal Information 2011 and 2012 created the COACh [Context, Objectives, Activity & Checklists] template to function as a legal research-activity/lesson-planning framework.

Please see here.

The 5th summer Conference on Legal Information is scheduled to be held at the University of Washington School of Law, July 11-13, 2013 — please see here.

U.S. Courts Expand Access to Judicial Opinions

Third Branch News of the United States Courts has today posted the following:

Access to Court Opinions Expands

Browse USCOURTS

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

U.S. Library of Congress Adds the Congressional Record to Congress.gov

The U.S. Library of Congress has added — among other things — the Congressional Record to Congress.gov.

Please see here.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.

FDsys [Federal Digital System] Adds Enhancements to U.S. Statutes at Large

From the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO):

The U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) recently enhanced the U.S. Statutes at Large collection on FDsys by adding descriptive metadata for public laws, private laws, concurrent resolutions, and presidential proclamations. For approximately 32,000 individual documents, the enhancements allow researchers improved searchability and retrieval by searching such metadata fields as title, SuDocs classification number, date, category, etc. The U.S. Statutes at Large collection includes volumes 65-115, covering the 82nd -107th Congresses, from 1951-2002.

The additional descriptive data was added by both manual and automatic processes. A team of GPO staff members from Library Services and Content Management (LSCM), including catalogers and automation librarians, added descriptive metadata for titles, public law numbers, and dates.

In 2011, GPO announced the release of digitized volumes of the U.S. Statutes at Large, in partnership with the Library of Congress. The U.S. Statutes at Large is the permanent collection of all laws and resolutions enacted during each session of Congress.

To browse U.S. Government publications at FDsys, please see here.

 

Cross-posted at Law Library Blog.

White Paper “Are All Citator Services Created Equal?”

An interesting recent brief report of Internet For Lawyers is:

Are All Citator Services Created Equal? A Comparison of Google Scholar, Fastcase, Casemaker, LexisNexis, WestlawNext, and Bloomberg
by Carole A. Levitt and Mark Rosch (2012)

Hat tip to the January/February 2013 issue of The Internet Guide for the Legal Researcher Newsletter.

Cross-posted on Law Library Blog.